Spreadsheet's Blog

Posted Friday, February 24, 2012 09:38 AM

NBA in Vegas? Here's one candidate

The Las Vegas Bucks. Nice ring to it.

There are some rumblings that the Milwaukee Bucks, seemingly frozen solid in the NBA no-man's land of mediocrity, might move when owner Herb Kohl either gets tired of pumping money into the team or passes on.

The Bucks aren't even winning two games out of five these days and appear a lock for another trip to the lottery. Fans have noticed, and if anyone thinks the Bradley Center will be torn down and replaced by new facility, you probably also think that LeBron James will be called for traveling in the final two minutes of a close game.

If the Bucks do move, it creates an opening for a Las Vegas-based NBA product, long a dream of city planners. The main stumbling block is a place to play, and the city can't seem to get a shovel in the ground as a way to entice a pro team.


Another problem: Many in the city are still creeped out by the fallout from the 2007 NBA All-Star Game in Vegas, when the players' entourages descended on the casinos for a weekend and intimidated some blackjack dealers to the point that they were calling in sick.

Having an NBA team in the city has about the same odds as the Bucks actually winning a title in the next five years, but it would be more than fun.

And since money rules on the Strip, the Bucks wouldn't even have to change their nickname.

Posted Friday, February 17, 2012 10:29 AM

Pros taking heat as Full Tilt players forced to wait

It's getting ugly at Full Tilt, where the new owners of the once-popular online poker site are pointing the fingers at TV pros as the reason mainstream players can't get their money back.

Groupe Bernard Tapie says everything would be fine if only the Mike Matusows and Phil Iveys would just pay back the money they owe the site. The players are responding by giving Tapie the figurative middle finger. Matusow claims that he owes Full Tilt's owners nothing, and says that is the exact amount they can expect to get from him.

Matusow's action's were child's play compared to recent comments from easy-going Canadian player Daniel Negreanu, who in his blog directed some zingers at Full Tilt's former owners, Howard Lederer and Chris Ferguson:

"I don’t think I would have any problem with somebody who had $15,000 of their hard-earned money on your site come up to you and bash you in the nuts with a baseball bat. Seriously, I’ve got no problem with it.”

No comment from Lederer or Ferguson, who have lawyered up and basically gone into hiding since the DoJ boarded up Full Tilt's site last April 15.

Pass the popcorn.



Posted Friday, February 03, 2012 12:44 PM

Iowa moves toward Internet gambling OK. Iowa???

Nevada has its ducks in a row as it moves closer to Internet gambling, but you might be able to make a few bucks if you bet on Iowa to place.

Iowa?

Iowa.

The state that gave religious zealot/family values politician Rick Santorum his only victory in the Republican primary race is working on plans to bring online casino games to flyover country. And with other areas just spinning their wheels (New Jersey) or taking a step back (Washington D.C.), Iowa is plodding along and may have a plan in place this spring.

Chances are it will start with Internet poker, where the president pro-tem of the Senate, Jeff Danielson, is a strong advocate.Danielson points out that the state is bleeding money because thousands of residents are playing outside the state.

Danielson says that gambling revenue would not be used to balance the state budget, which he says is already in pretty good shape. In fact, he even has offered to place the state's take in an account that couldn't be accessed for two or three years.

Prof. Nelson Rose, the leading authority on gambling issues relating to the law, says that Iowa relishes the idea of being first, pointing out the number of casinos in a socially conservative state.

Danielson no doubt will have his hands full, but there is optimism that his state will be among the first to the finish line, helping break a logjam and allowing us to log on without worrying about government intervention.